Maury River Friends Meeting

The text of recently received Spiritual State of the Meeting Reports are below, with the most recently received at the top and older reports below. To jump to a particular report, simply click the year listed below.

2011 Report 2012 Report 2013 Report 2014 Report
2015 Report  

2015 Report


2014 Report

Maury River Friends devoted two Second Hours to BYM’s questions about the Spiritual State of our Meeting.

Friends enjoy group singing before Meeting for Worship on first and third Sundays, and Second Hours continue to be vital to the health of our Meeting community. 2014 Second Hours provided a good mix of discussion and fellowship that helped explore our world, understand, and share individual and community Quaker life. The new approach to organizing Second Hours by asking members and attenders to suggest topics and lead discussions, has been productive and positive. Recording some Second Hour presentations is a possibility.

The frequency and depth of vocal ministry—“amazing synthesis in a few sentences” – during worship feels very important as well. One friend said that while she liked the silence, which was often very powerful, she relished vocal ministry and found worship more meaningful when vocal ministry was shared. “I want to know what Quakers are all about.” The etymology of ‘worship’ being based on “worth” was discussed – when worship is thought of as “worth-ship,” vocal ministry may be less intimidating, becoming a process of sharing what arises when we open ourselves to consider what is of worth in our lives and experience. Some of us find that messages can cause discomfort since Truth sometimes involves shining the Light on darkness – and that as a group, we are too prone to say what we don’t do (fight, clergy, sacraments…) rather than what we do do and why. Worship and Ministry drafted a statement this year on Maury River’s practice of vocal ministry. Both by inviting and encouraging vocal ministry, and by addressing the concern of “self-censoring” and the harm that can do to both individual and corporate spiritual growth, the statement was felt to be caring and supportive.

Meeting encourages newer attenders to come forward to fill committee needs. Despite smaller numbers on most committees, members and attenders feel that we do a good job of loving those who are with us, and of supporting families in need. This year we brought Worship and Ministry back together with Care and Counsel (now being Ministry and Counsel) to be able to do all our work better.

Though our numbers are smaller, we are getting grayer, have fewer young families, and very few children, we recognize with gratitude that our children who have grown and gone continue to send ripples out from their years with us. The physical distances between us – mostly we see each other only once a week – make close social interaction difficult. As a rural meeting, demographics are not on our side, but the quietude and grace of our Meeting House is seen as supportive of the spirit. This year we participated in the Rockbridge Historical Society’s tour of historical local churches and Friends were able to share with visitors information about the history of our building and of Quakers in Virginia.

The up side of our years in MRFM is being seasoned in doing business together. Even when we grapple with strong differences, our gratitude for the disciplines of centered clerking and the willingness to speak, listen, and learn in the Spirit help us move through together.

Many individuals in the Maury River community have been involved in BYM committees, Pendle Hill and FGC, and enjoy the broader Quaker connection. And the larger number participating on our Peace and Justice committee reflects Meeting’s involvement in the larger world. Challenges before us include taking our consideration of right relationship to creation to a deeper level toward meaningful action together, and finding ways to show up better for Rockbridge County’s college-age community. Perhaps aspects of Quaker Quest and the workshop discussed for this fall will help.


2013 Report

Maury River Friends Meeting is committed to caring for its community of members and attenders as well as to reaching out to the wider world of Friends. There has been a continued openness to listening to individual journeys, ideas and challenges. As one member stated, it is our Meeting’s commitment to Quakerism that binds us together, and that can be observed in all that Maury River Meeting does.

The Spirit is nurtured and prospered among us in as many ways as we are individuals. That can sometimes be a challenge for our Meeting. The language of the spirit is individual and sometimes misunderstood. However, the intent and meaning of the Spirit is universal among us. We nurture that through shared spiritual journeys, threshing sessions and clearness committees, in addition to Meeting for Worship which is central to everything we do.

We hold 2nd Hour each Sunday to explore topics of Quakerism that are important to the Meeting and to individuals. There continues to be an expressed need to spend more time together in community building activities. Due to the large geographic area our meeting serves, finding additional shared gathering time is hard. We do meet for traditional events such as our Christmas Eve candlelighting, the summer Goshen Pass potluck, Meetinghouse workdays, and potlucks held in Friends’ homes throughout the year. Baltimore Yearly Meeting’s activities are attended and enjoyed by a number of our members/attenders.

Our committee work is active and supports the life of the meeting. Care and Counsel has had a fairly quiet year in 2013, and looks forward to focusing again on our Planning Ahead for the End of Life booklet. Worship and Ministry is aware of the desire for more vocal ministry during worship and is engaging with that challenge. Youth Religious Education works to include a wider spread of volunteers from Meeting to share time with the children. Our Fellowship Committee facilitates a number of ways for us to grow together as a community. Our Meetinghouse is well cared for under House & Grounds Committee’s leadership. Our Trustees and the Finance and Stewardship Committee drew up a long-range plan for our use of the Meetinghouse in response to concerns about its ecological footprint. As a Meeting, we continue to be challenged with outreach. We have had no Advancement & Outreach committee for some years and currently have few young adult members/attenders and children. There is little apparent diversity among us. We are welcoming to newcomers and visitors, but perhaps could do a better job with helping them to feel more comfortable in our fellowship activities. We do participate in community service projects and have created a “tree of impact” – basically a visual of all of the local community organizations which MRF members/attenders participate in. We also now have an updated website on the Quaker Cloud focused on providing information and inspiration to possible newcomers.

Maury River Friends have adopted a version of “benevolent giving” which we call the ‘Sharing Budget’. We give to Friends’ organizations and/or local organizations that reflect our Meeting’s social and environmental concerns. Our Peace and Justice committee has created a binder holding those organizations’ names, contact information, and giving history - this is kept in the meeting house. We also keep emergency special needs opportunities in the book.

Maury River Friends Meeting is committed to its community of members/attenders and to nurturing their individual spiritual journeys.


2012 Report

In preparing this report for Baltimore Yearly Meeting, we have been struck by a sense of deepening spiritual community at Maury River Friends Meeting.

Friends often express gratitude for the spiritual community we have and the support we give one another. During worship sharing, one Friend spoke of the warmth and love she has felt and how Meeting has enriched her marriage. Another Friend spoke about when women appeared at his home to help him when his wife had an operation and was undergoing physical therapy. These personal relations with others in Meeting lifted her
spirits too. Even Friends who cannot attend Meeting for Worship or second hour every week report Spirit-led experiences in worship and in committee meetings.

Such experiences of spiritual community can be difficult these days. Our fast-paced and busy lives make connections harder to forge and maintain. And we may find it easier to do the good that needs to be done than to speak about the Spirit’s movement in our lives. It is hard to express the Spirit in words, but Friends have led us in several profound second hours devoted to their spiritual journeys. Such communication builds trust
and understanding and helps us come to know one another “in that which is Eternal.” We also need simply to spend more time together to know each other better in that which may not be eternal. Second hours are valuable both for sharing ourselves with one another and for clarifying our sense of the Spirit among us. In these digital days, the e-mailed messages and
newsletter, especially the front-page column of reflections and calendar, have been helpful in keeping Maury River Friends connected.

This past year was our second year without a consistent Clerk of Meeting. Sharing the clerking duties among ten different Friends, we knew we risked losing the continuity and coherence that the Clerk of Meeting can bring.
But our dedicated committees maintained continuity, so the burden did not fall on the temporary clerks. It was reassuring to find those resources among us. We have had some difficult issues before us this year, and well-seasoned
clerks have helped us move forward with good Quaker process.

Our Meeting has occasionally had trouble grappling with complex and detailed practical matters, but the manner in which we received and adopted a new approach to our budget was a good example of Spirit making itself felt among us. We decided to divide our budget into four segments, each of which would receive equal funding. This increased our
budget significantly, while providing the sense that our values were driving our expenditures, rather than the other way around. Our minute on Right Relationship with Creation was another long-term commitment that we
undertook both within the Peace and Justice Committee and in Meeting as a whole. Now we face the task of bringing this commitment to bear on changing wasteful habits, individually and corporately. We long for a “third way” to emerge in a Spirit-led process, and we strive for willingness to be surprised.

The work of Religious Education Committee has led to a deepening of Spirit for adults and children. Our Meeting has felt buoyed by the young people, and we treasure the young Friends who come to meeting. Older Friends are also experiencing the ways in which our spiritual community has affected their adult children who have left home to begin their own journeys.

A clear sign of Spirit prospering among us is the addition of three new members, one by transfer and two by convincement. While numbers do not tell the whole story, they suggest the deep current of spiritual community running through Maury River Friends Meeting.

Respectfully,
Jim Warren
Clerk, Worship and Ministry Committee


2011 Report

Report on Spiritual State of the Meeting 2011

Two keywords, “support” and “deep,” have come up often as we responded to queries about the spiritual state of Maury River Friends Monthly Meeting.

Friends have felt supported in their spiritual lives this past year because discussions with others in Meeting have deepened our understanding of one another, whether in book groups, during second hours, in gathering for fellowship, or in simple phone calls. Meeting for worship also becomes deeper as a result, and in turn the gathered meeting deepens the supportive network of Meeting. Even when there is little vocal ministry, the silence of worship can be very deep, opening possibilities and surprises to all. We appreciated having Betsy Meyer visit us for a workshop and second hour in October, and we have felt new life in vocal ministry as a result.

After several years of seeing our children grow up and move on, we have been delighted to welcome two new babies into our midst. One of the deep joys of Meeting has been the growth of love among us, clearly witnessed in young Friends and children. As one very young Friend remarked about the contributions to the Heifer Project from the annual fundraising spaghetti supper, “It’s like holding someone in the Light, only more efficient.”

Worship and Ministry Committee planned a series of second hours in which Friends shared their spiritual journeys. This successful effort has fostered a growth in trust, a willingness to take risks, and a building confidence that we are large enough to surround differences. Many remark on the feeling of warmth and acceptance from Friends, and many respond to that feeling with gratitude. Care and Counsel Committee has had several clearness committees that have been helpful to Friends, and the practice of listening with care has grown among us.

Peace and Justice Committee has worked all year on drafting a minute on right relationship with Creation, and this work will continue with Meeting as a whole in 2012. Many Friends express their sense that right relationship is fostered among us as a Meeting as we struggle to discern truth, spiritual presence, and a way forward in our lives together. We understand that the minute will record our ongoing search for openness and discernment, and we are confident that Spirit leads us in positive directions.

While we continue to be grateful to our committees, we have been challenged in 2011 in several ways. We have not had a full-time clerk of meeting this year, nor have we been able to settle upon a clerk going forward in 2012. Instead, we have rotated the clerk’s role among six Friends, being careful to communicate well and be attentive to the continuity of matters before the Meeting. We have much work to do in encouraging committee work and being sure that our committees function well and that members are energized and positive in the work they do for us all. Many committees and their members feel stretched by the pressures of time and commitments in busy lives, and some have felt less supported than they would hope to be.

As we move into the new year, Maury River Friends seek to share their spiritual journeys in acceptance and love for one another. We trust in Spirit to support and deepen our journey.