Manual of Procedure

IX. Representatives to Other Organizations

Representatives to organizations not part of the Yearly Meeting but to which the Yearly Meeting regularly nominates, appoints, or sends representatives, are nominated by the Nominating Committee and appointed by the Yearly Meeting in accordance with the procedures of the organizations to which they are named.

American Friends Service Committee

The American Friends Service Committee carries out service, development, social justice, and peace programs throughout the world. Founded by Quakers in 1917 to provide conscientious objectors with an opportunity to aid civilian war victims. Attracting the support and partnership of people of many races, religions, and cultures, AFSC’s work is based on the Quaker belief in the worth of every person and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice.

AFSC is directed by the American Friends Service Committee Corporation, through a Board of Directors elected by the Corporation from among its members. Corporation members all must be members of the Religious Society of Friends.

Baltimore Yearly Meeting may appoint five persons to the Corporation. These persons, nominated by the Nominating Committee and appointed by the Yearly Meeting, in staggered three-year terms are expected to participate in the annual meeting of the Corporation, usually held in Philadelphia.

These representatives are selected from those interested in projects of the American Friends Service Committee. They attempt to interest other persons in contributing to, working for, and being concerned about the American Friends Service Committee.

Friends Committee on National Legislation

The Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL) is a public interest lobby founded in 1943 by members of the Religious Society of Friends. FCNL seeks to bring the concerns, experiences, and testimonies of Friends to bear on policy decisions in the nation’s capital. People of many religious backgrounds participate in this work. FCNL’s staff and volunteers work with a nationwide network of thousands to advocate social and economic justice, peace, and good government.

FCNL is governed by a General Committee of 240 Friends, two-thirds of whom are appointed by 26 of the U.S. Yearly Meetings and seven national Friends organizations; the other third is appointed by the General Committee itself. All members of the General Committee must be members of the Religious Society of Friends and U. S. citizens. The General Committee meets each November to conduct business that includes establishing legislative policy and priorities. Between these Annual Meetings an Executive Committee and several other Committees guide the program and administration of FCNL. Further information is available at the FCNL web site.

The six Baltimore Yearly Meeting representatives to the FCNL are nominated by the Nominating Committee and appointed by the Yearly Meeting, two each year for three-year terms.

These representatives are selected from those interested in the work of the Friends Committee on National Legislation and are expected to participate in its meetings. They attempt to educate other persons concerning the purposes of the Friends Committee on National Legislation in the area of civic action in matters of concern to Friends, and to interest others in contributing to, and working for, this organization.

Friends Wilderness Center

The Friends Wilderness Center provides a place for meditation and spiritual nourishment in a rustic environment within Rolling Ridge Foundation property in Jefferson County, West Virginia. Its mission includes preserving this natural sanctuary and hosting a variety of events. The Board of Directors consists of six to fifteen members, a majority of whom must be members of the Society of Friends. Unity with Nature recommends to Nominating one person for a three-year, once renewable, appointment by the Yearly Meeting, to serve on the Board of Directors.

Prisoner Visitation and Support

Prisoner Visitation and Support is an interfaith visitation program that is authorized to visit all federal and military prisons in the U.S. Its visitors are volunteers who meet monthly with prisoners who have requested visits. Priority is given to those who are in solitary confinement, are on death row, are serving long sentences, or who do not receive other visits. The organization is nonprofit and separate from official prison structures.

The Peace and Social Concerns Committee recommends to Nominating, as appropriate, one person to be approved by the Board of Directors of Prisoner Visitation and Support for a three-year, once renewable term. The Board meets in Philadelphia two or three times a year.

Quaker Earthcare Witness

The Quaker Earthcare Witness is an organization of North American Quakers seeking ways to integrate their concern for environment with Friends long-standing testimonies for simplicity, peace and equality. It has a policy-making General Committee to which Yearly Meetings name representatives. A smaller Steering Committee, drawn from the General Committee, oversees ongoing activities.

The Unity with Nature Committee suggests names, as appropriate, to the Nominating Committee for appointment by the Yearly Meeting of a representative and an alternate representative for a three-year, once renewable appointment to the Steering Committee of Quaker Earthcare Witness.

Quaker House, Fayetteville, N.C.

Established in 1969, Quaker House is an incorporated organization with representatives appointed by three yearly meetings and other socially-concerned agencies. It provides assistance to military personnel, their families, and those contemplating military service. Quaker House offers counseling in the areas of conscientious objection, delayed enlistment claims, and Absent Without Leave and Unauthorized Absence issues. As appropriate, Peace and Social Concerns Committee recommends to Nominating one person for a three-year, once renewable, appointment by the Yearly Meeting, to serve on the Board of Directors of Quaker House, which meets five times a year in Fayetteville, North Carolina.

William Penn House

William Penn House is a Quaker seminar and hospitality center in Washington, District of Columbia. Established in 1966 as a project of Friends Meeting of Washington, it was incorporated as an independent, nonprofit entity in November 1993. Its structure includes a National Consultative Committee of representatives from 20 Friends organizations and Yearly Meetings.

Baltimore Yearly Meeting may appoint one person as representative and one alternate to the National Consultative Committee for a term of three years. Nominations are made by the Nominating Committee and approved by the Yearly Meeting in session.